The Joy of a Proper Spatula

LamsonSharp Slotted Turner

Most spatulas suck.

This spatula, from LamsonSharp, emphatically does not suck.

It has a thin leading edge, so it slips right under your food without mauling it or ruining the crust. It is strong and flexible. It has nice, wide slots that allow oil or sauces to remain behind in the pan. It has a nice curve so your hand doesn’t have to go down into your skillet.

By the way, in the trade, this kind of turner is known universally as a “fish spat”. Don’t let that fool you. It is a pleasure to use every time I slip it under a square of tofu, latke or leek fritter.

The edge is angled, so if you are left handed you want this version.

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Posted by Michael Natkin on Wednesday, August 1st, 2012 in Kitchen Utensils, My Kitchen.

11 Responses to “The Joy of a Proper Spatula”

  1. August 1, 2012 at 6:58 am #

    I have that too, but a different brand (from William Sonoma.) LOVE it! That’s the one I always reach for!

  2. August 1, 2012 at 7:10 am #

    Thanks for sharing! I feel like there are so many good cooking tools out there, but it’s hard to know which ones are tried and true — blogging about them is a great idea!

  3. August 1, 2012 at 7:55 am #

    Dammit. I just bought my second spatula (yesterday!) and this one was sitting right there within my grasp. Must go back.

  4. August 1, 2012 at 7:10 pm #

    I can refer to your statement: most spatulas do suck. I did invest in couple of those fish spatulas a few years ago and must admit: it is a pleasure to use it indeed. Yes, why do they call it fish spatula? It is so confusing and so wrong! :)

  5. August 1, 2012 at 7:36 pm #

    Hey Marina – I think they were initially invented so that delicate fish could be turned in a pan without wrecking them, but cooks quickly realized that there were a thousand and one uses.

  6. August 2, 2012 at 1:07 pm #

    This is the only spat I own.

  7. ellabee
    August 6, 2012 at 8:29 am #

    I have that very spatula, and although it’s very useful, I wish I’d gotten one with a plastic or impregnated rather than a wooden handle. It’s fussy to clean because you can’t just set it down into a pan of water to soak, but have to make sure that the handle stays dry. Repeated swelling and shrinking of wood will greatly shorten its working life.

    • August 6, 2012 at 8:51 am #

      I’m thinking you have the “vintage” version with the wooden handle, which I agree, would be a bad idea. The one I have (and the one linked on Amazon) has a black handle that seems to be plastic. I’ve run it through the dishwasher hundreds of times with no problems.

  8. Kathryn
    September 8, 2012 at 6:12 am #

    Yes! We discovered these about two years ago and they are wonderful. I highly recommend…and now give them as gifts frequently to anyone who loves to cook.

  9. Michelle
    December 8, 2012 at 4:13 pm #

    I bought this several years ago and it is my go-to spatula. However, since it is metal, it is not recommended fo non-stick pans. When I do use it itch non-stick, I am very careful. But I’d love to know if you’ve a non metal version.

    I’m just discovering your blog after seeing you on KCTS Cooks/sides. I love Brussels sprouts nd hope I’ll find the recipes here.

    Thanks for a great website!
    Michelle

    • December 9, 2012 at 8:43 am #

      Hey Michelle – for non-stick, you really can’t use metal implements. I like silicone spatulas like this: link to herbivoracious.com for use in non-sticks, but of course they don’t have thin leading edges for flipping. I’ve got some thin plastic spatulas for flipping but I can’t say I love any of them.

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